Wind Ensemble

Grade 3:

This Cruel Moon

Lightning Field

Foundry

Sheltering Sky

 

Grade 4 / 4+:

Clocking

Hymn to a Blue Hour

Night on Fire

Ringmaster's March

Strange Humors

Undertow

Unquiet Spirits

Xerxes

 

Grade 5 / 5+:

Asphalt Cocktail

Aurora Awakes

The Frozen Cathedral

Fanfare for
       Full Fathom Five

High Wire

Kingfishers Catch Fire

Liminal (NEW)

Redacted

Redline Tango

Sasparilla

Songs from the
       End of the World

The Soul Has
  
   Many Motions

Turbine

Turning

Wine-Dark Sea:
     Symphony for Band

 

Concertos:

Drum Music: Perc. Cto

Harvest: Tbn. Cto.

Sop. Sax Concerto

 

Chamber Music

Vocal Music

Orchestra

Music for Theater

Works in Progress

 

Harvest : Concerto for Trombone (2009)

Audio & Score

for solo trombone and orchestra without strings

Click to buy : Score: $95. Parts for hire.

duration: circa 18'


Commissioned by The Ridgewood Concert Band, The West Point Military Academy Band,
University of Texas at Austin, United States Air Force Academy, Illinois State University,
University of Florida, Miami University, University of Georgia, Texas Tech University, Case Western Reserve University, Ithaca College, University of South Carolina, University of Washington, Roxbury High School, University of South Florida, Florida State University, Baylor University, Syracuse University, McNeese State University, Arizona State University, University of Alabama.

"Harvest: Concerto for Trombone" is based on the myths and mystery rituals of the Greek god Dionysus. As the Olympian god of the vine, Dionysus is famous for inspiring ecstasy and creativity. But this agricultural, earth-walking god was also subjected each year to a cycle of agonizing death before glorious rebirth, analogous to the harsh pruning and long winter the vines endure before blooming again in the spring. The concerto's movements attempt to represent this dual nature and the cycle of suffering and return.

The concerto is set in three connected sections, totaling approximately 18 minutes. The first section begins with a slow introduction, heavy on ritualistic percussion, representing the summoning of Dionysus's worshippers to the ceremony. The rite itself builds in intensity, with Dionysus (represented, of course, by the solo trombone) engaging in call and response with his followers, some of whom are driven to an ecstatic outcry -- almost a "speaking in tongues" --represented by insistent woodwind trills. But when Dionysus transitions to a gentler tone, his frenzied worshippers do not follow. Their fervor overcomes them, and they tear their god to shreds in an act of ritual madness.

This brutal sacrifice by the ecstatic worshippers -- the pruning of the vine -- is followed without pause by the second section, representing Dionysus in the stillness of death, or winter. The god is distant, the music like a prayer.

The shoots of spring burst forth in the final section, following again without pause. The earth is reborn as Dionysus rises again, bringing the ecstasy and liberation that have been celebrated in his name for centuries.

"Harvest: Concerto for Trombone" is dedicated to Joseph Alessi.