Wind Ensemble

Grade 3:

This Cruel Moon

Lightning Field

Foundry

Sheltering Sky

 

Grade 4 / 4+:

Clocking

Hymn to a Blue Hour

Night on Fire

Ringmaster's March

Strange Humors

Undertow

Unquiet Spirits

Xerxes

 

Grade 5 / 5+:

Asphalt Cocktail

Aurora Awakes

The Frozen Cathedral

Fanfare for
       Full Fathom Five

High Wire

Kingfishers Catch Fire

Liminal (NEW)

Redacted

Redline Tango

Sasparilla

Songs from the
       End of the World

The Soul Has
  
   Many Motions

Turbine

Turning

Wine-Dark Sea:
     Symphony for Band

 

Concertos:

Antique Violences:
     Trumpet Concerto

Drum Music: Perc. Cto

Harvest: Tbn. Cto.

Sop. Sax Concerto

 

Chamber Music

Vocal Music

Orchestra

Music for Theater

Works in Progress

 

This Cruel Moon (2017)

Audio & Score

for concert band
duration: 6' - 7.5' depending on interpretation

Grade 3.5

Click to buy : Full set $165. Extra 9x12 score $20.

This piece is an adaptation of the middle movement of "Wine-Dark Sea: Symphony for Band." The full symphony tells the tale of Odysseus and his journey home following his victory in the Trojan War. But Odysseus' journey would take as long as the war itself. Homer called the ocean on which Odysseus sailed a wine-dark sea, and for the Greek king it was as murky and disorienting as its name; he would not find his way across it without first losing himself.

"This Cruel Moon" is the song of the beautiful and immortal nymph Kalypso, who finds Odysseus near death, washed up on the shore of the island where she lives all alone. She nurses him back to health, and sings as she moves back and forth with a golden shuttle at her loom. Odysseus shares her bed; seven years pass. The tapestry she began when she nursed him becomes a record of their love.

But one day Odysseus remembers his home. He tells Kalypso he wants to leave her, to return to his wife and son. He scoffs at all she has given him. Kalypso is heartbroken.

And yet, that night, Kalypso again paces at her loom. She unravels her tapestry and weaves it into a sail for Odysseus. In the morning, she shows Odysseus a raft, equipped with the sail she has made and stocked with bread and wine, and calls up a gentle and steady wind to carry him home. Shattered, she watches him go; he does not look back.